PBS’ Saving the Ocean: Octopus Fishing in Pemba (web segment)

After completing production on the ten-part series, Saving the Ocean, Director John Angier noticed that we were left with a tonne of unused, but fantastic, footage that could not make it to the half-hour broadcast shows. We then turned some of that unused footage into video extras for online streaming.

It’s a whole different world out there. In ‘Octopus Fishing in Pemba‘, watch men and boys, from Pemba’s fishing villages, free dive to catch octopuses for sale and consumption.  This is a web segment from Saving the Ocean’s episode on Pemba, a beautiful east African island- The Sacred Island’. 

 

Visit the Saving the Ocean site to watch the videos extras in higher quality.


PBS’ Saving the Ocean: Pemba’s Reef Splendor (web segment)

After completing production on the ten-part series, Saving the Ocean, Director John Angier noticed that we were left with a tonne of unused, but fantastic, footage that could not make it to the half-hour broadcast shows. We then turned some of that unused footage into video extras for online streaming.

‘Pemba’s Reef Splendor’ is a look at breathtakingly beautiful marine life in the reefs off the east coast of Africa, and is a web segment from Saving the Ocean’s episode on this beautiful African island- ‘The Sacred Island’. 

Watch the shows on pbs.org/savingtheocean

Watch the shows on pbs.org/savingtheocean

Visit the Saving the Ocean site to watch the videos extras in higher quality.


Agony and Ivory- Alex Shoumatoff reports about greedy ivory trade and disappearing African elephants (LOE)

Carved ivory statue in Guangzhou, China. (Wikipedia Commons)

A shocking feature story by Alex Shoumatoff, in August 2011’s, issue of Vanity Fair opened my eyes to the rampant poaching of African elephants in the continent today. The issue created a stir globally in the 1990s but subsequent bans on ivory trade and interventions by policy groups like CITES and TRAFFIC  seemingly brought the crisis under control. However, the bans have not been entirely successful and African forests are still littered with elephant carcasses. The hungry market for ivory in China is being nourished and fed by Chinese labourers in Africa and poor African communities. Estimates say that hundreds of elephants are being killed every year to meet the demands for illegal ivory. Shoumatoff’s story , Agony and Ivory, describes his investigation from the jungles of Africa to the mantelpiece of the Chinese businessman.

I worked on the story during my internship with ‘Living on Earth’ and we interviewed Shoumatoff who spoke to us from Montreal, Canada.

CLICK HERE to listen to the story!